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Giving your Performance and Show Animals the Edge to Win
 
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Application of Transfer Factors in Veterinary Medicine and the Cellular Immune Response
 
Dr. Will Falconer, DVM - "Most of the chronic diseases we commonly see in animals (and humans) have an immune basis, e.g. diabetes, allergies, asthma, thyroid disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, repeated ear infections, cancer, etc. While they can be cured through the careful use of homeopathy, the road to cure can be a long one -- often years if the animal has had years of disease. Transfer factors can significantly shorten the course, by giving a much needed balancing effect to the immune system. If the immune system is overactive as in allergies, ear infections, asthma, diabetes, or hypothyroidism, transfer factors can balance this overactivity so the system is not attacking its own organs, overreacting to things that shouldn’t be perceived as a threat. If, conversely, the immune system is under-active as in mange, parasites, viral infections, or cancer, transfer factors can clearly stimulate it to better meet the challenges it needs to be alert to."
 
 
Transfer factor: Long-awaited next step in immunotherapy

Immunotherapy was predicted to be one of the most rapidly expanding areas of medical science in this decade.

Proposed advances in our ability to manipulate the protection offered by the body's own immune system were going to make humans and animals far healthier and were promising to increase both the length and quality of life.

Immune agents were going to be our new defenses against those microorganisms that no longer responded to antibiotics and diseases from allergies to cancer were going to be subdued by this new field.

Slow in coming

To date, however, those advances have been slow in coming. We have not been able to manipulate the body's own defenses as planned and we have few effective immune stimulants.

Positive research data has been piling up concerning the most promising immune agent in years, though, and immunologists may be finally making good on their earlier predictions.

Transfer factor, as this new immune compound is being called, may be the long-awaited "next step" and it may be everything that was promised.

Richard Bennet Ph.D., an infectious disease immunologist writes, "It is our ability to create a really healthy immune system that I think represents the greatest potential gains in health in the world."

It is the immune system, after all, which provides humans and animals with the ability to recognize and remember potentially harmful foreign substances such as bacteria and viruses. The immune system allows us to then respond to these threatening invaders in our systems.

Devastatingly familiar

The consequences of conditions of suppressed or damaged immune systems are devastatingly familiar to veterinarians.

Arab foals with combined immunodeficiency complex and older horses with chronic laminitis due to Cushing's disease-related effects are but two such examples. Respiratory problems in young foals, allergies, skin infections, and hoof wall diseases are other problems that can also be related to immune system dysfunction.

A new agent that would vastly improve immune function in horses would certainly warrant some attention. Transfer factor promises to be this new agent. It is a component of colostrum and is produced to be used as a powder added to the diet.

Structure, function

To understand what this colostral derivative may potentially mean to veterinarians and horses, it is necessary to briefly review the structure and function of the immune system.

The body has two principal immune defense systems: humoral and cellular. B-lymphocytes in the liver, spleen, lymph nodes and bone marrow produce plasma cells that in turn produce antibodies in the gamma globulin fraction. These immunoglobulins can potentially recognize huge numbers of antigens. This is the basis of humoral immunity.

Humoral immunoglobulins are primarily designed to fight bacterial infections. Lymphocytes that populate the thymus become responsible for cellular immunity. These cells produce structures called lymphokines that mediate delayed hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. They are responsible for rejection of transferred foreign tissue and for the recognition and rejection of tumor cells.

The cellular immunity system is responsible for defense against infections due to viruses, fungi and some types of bacteria and cancers. Transfer factor stimulates both portions of the immune system.

In the beginning

In 1949, Dr. H. Sherwood Lawrence, a researcher working on tuberculosis, found that he could transfer immunity between patients using fractionated white blood cells. The key ingredient was a part of the lymphocyte cell, and Lawrence called this component "transfer factor."

This discovery was not actively pursued for nearly 30 years until the late '80s. At that time colostrum and milk were discovered to contain significant amounts of transfer factor. The exact mechanism of action of transfer factor has never been determined but it is now known that transfer factor is a lymphokine. The two most notable lymphokines are interferon and interleukins.

These lymphokines are protein messengers thought to be released by antigen-sensitized lymphocytes. They play a role in macrophage activation, lymphocyte transformation (the process of precursor cells becoming B and T cells), and in cell-mediated immunity. Transfer factor is one of the most potent messengers and has three distinct effects on the immune system.

Recognizes antigens

Transfer factor helps the body recognize antigens.

Dr. M. Metz, a veterinarian consulting for 4LifeResearch, the company which has the patent for extracting transfer factor from colostrum, points out that 200 mg (one capsule) of transfer factor has the potential for recognizing at least 100,000 pathogens. Metz adds that not only can transfer factor be specific for an individual antigen that a lymphocyte is exposed to, but "transfer factor can also stimulate a multivalent response."

In this type of response, transfer factor activates lymphocytes to several strains of an organism.

"This is the really exciting part of transfer factor from a practicing veterinary standpoint," says Metz.

4LifeResearch has found that by exposing cattle to various bacteria and viruses they can produce transfer factor that will stimulate immunity to other related strains of bacteria and viruses that are much more pathogenic to other species.

"The other really exciting aspect of transfer factor," says Metz, "is the time sequence."

Most types of delayed hypersensitivity immunity, such as that seen with vaccine use, take 10 to 14 days to develop. Transfer factor, according to Metz, activates that same immunity in 24 hours!

Natural killer

Transfer factor is also a natural killer cell inductor. These cells are non-specific attack cells that seek out and destroy infected or malignant cells and cells infected by viruses.

Transfer factor increases natural killer cell activity five times over normal rates and it is non-species specific. It is believed that this aspect of transfer factor is related to the significant improvements seen in certain cancer patients that have taken this product. Multiple sclerosis patients have also shown improvements.

Transfer factor in cats, dogs, horses, cows and humans is virtually identical structurally and completely identical functionally. This has helped in the production of this product since cows can produce large quantities of colostrum that is then used for extraction of transfer factor.

A number of companies are producing colostrum and claiming that these products contain transfer factor. While this is true, only 4LifeResearch has the exclusive patent on the process to extract only transfer factor. This process allows for the concentrated and purified production of transfer factor.

Suppresses immune function

Transfer factor is also a suppressor of immune function.

It is paradoxical that the same product can both stimulate and suppress immune function but transfer factor function depends on the specific antigens and the status of the immune response. Transfer factor can stimulate the release of T suppressor cells when "down" regulation is necessary due to over activity. Autoimmune diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and allergic reactions are situations where the body's own immune response has over-responded (cytokine storm) to antigenic stimulation. Transfer factor works in these situations because it can slow down this overactive response.

Obvious advantages

While discussions of the immune system tend to be fairly technical, the practical advantages of a potent new immune stimulating treatment are obvious.

The ability to stimulate the horse's body to attack and destroy bacteria and viruses will reduce the amount and types of antibiotics that may need to be used by veterinarians. It is important to try to retain those antibiotics that are available to veterinarians and to use them in a way that will maintain their effectiveness for as long as possible.

If veterinarians can stimulate a better immune response to respiratory bacteria, skin pathogens and various viruses, then the need to use antibiotics is lessened. If transfer factor can produce such boosts in immunity in 24 hours then the potential for use as a pre-travel protectant, or a post-exposure treatment is tremendous.

Horses suffering from other diseases such as Cushing's disease, laminitis, colitis, cancers ranging from sarcoids to melanomas and reproductive conditions such as chronic metritis, may all benefit from transfer factor use. This product may indeed be the long-awaited next step and the field of immunotherapy may finally fulfill its promise.

 
 
SOME DETAILS ABOUT
TRANSFER FACTOR
Mac Barksdale, DVM
 
 
Veterinary Message:  1-866-315-4004
Listen to several veterinarians talk about the
use of transfer factor in their practice
 
 
4life Transfer Factors make up a highly concentrated immune messaging system, designed by nature to transfer immune programming from one individual to another, both human and animal alike
 
Dr. Rob Robertson, M.D. 
 
"Transfer factors make up a highly concentrated immune messaging system, designed by nature to transfer immune programming from one individual to another, both human and animal alike."   "Transfer factors are the most exciting discovery in immunology. As the 21st Century unfolds, transfer factors will be one of our greatest keys to health and well being." 
 
 
Dr. Sam Jones, DVM  4life Transfer Factor has been a remarkable addition to my veterinary practice.
Dr.Sam Jones
DVM
 
"Transfer factors has been a remarkable addition to my veterinary practice.  It is an amazing immune booster that provides support for so many conditions that animals have.
 
 
Dr. Joe Ramaekers, DVM 4life Transfer Factor is a powerful immune system activator that has the ability to boost the immune system in an entirely different way.
Dr.Joe Ramaekers, DVM
"Transfer factors are truly the missing link in the nutritional approach to preventive medicine for all pets.  It is a powerful immune system activator that has the ability to boost the immune system in an entirely different way." 
 
 
ransfer Factor Plus for pets is a natural and science based product for the health of all our animal friends. Dr.Bennett is an Infectious Disease Microbiologist and Immunologist.
Dr.RichardBennett, Ph.D.
"Bacterial infections, viral infections and immune system fatigue cause a host of disease problems in pets, especially in very young and older animals.  Transfer factors naturally provides full immune system power and is a natural and science based product for the health of all our animal friends." 
Dr. Bennett is an Infectious Disease Microbiologist and Immunologist.
 
 
Dr. Will Falconer, DVM
"Most of the chronic diseases we commonly see in animals (and humans) have an immune basis, e.g. diabetes, allergies, asthma, thyroid disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, repeated ear infections, cancer, etc. While they can be cured through the careful use of homeopathy, the road to cure can be a long one -- often years if the animal has had years of disease. Transfer factors can significantly shorten the course, by giving a much needed balancing effect to the immune system. If the immune system is overactive as in allergies, ear infections, asthma, diabetes, or hypothyroidism, transfer factors can balance this overactivity so the system is not attacking its own organs, overreacting to things that shouldn’t be perceived as a threat. If, conversely, the immune system is under-active as in mange, parasites, viral infections, or cancer, transfer factors can clearly stimulate it to better meet the challenges it needs to be alert to."
have.
 
 
 

recommends transfer factors. This new book written by Kenneth A. Bock, M.D., Steven J. Bock, M.D. is designed to give families and individuals preventative strategies to use to protect against germs and environmental threats. Transfer factors are extolled in the book as an effective way to optimize immune system function so that personal immunity is at its best in the face of a variety of health threats.

Dr. Steven Slag
le, DVM
'A cat with Leukemia, an oral tumor, and posterior paralysis due to a spinal tumor was very ill and emaciated.  One month after starting her on transfer factors (human formula) at 1 capsule per day, there was some regression of the oral tumor, restored appetite with some weight gain, and  increased sociability.  Five months later, this cat continues to improve - she regained her normal weight, her oral tumor has regressed 80%, and she has regained the use of her hind legs and tail.
 
 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Many veterinarians recommend the human transfer factors formulas instead of the canine and feline  formulas for their sick animals. In the below testimonials, the veterinarians, medical doctor and pet owner used the human  transfer factors formulas, to treat their animals. Dr. Slagle (above) used the human formula to treat the leukemia, paralysed cat. The human formulas comes in a small capsule and it is easier to give a sick animal who doesn't want to eat. It is easy to shove the capusle into the throat, or empty the content into the pet's food. Some people mix the powder with a little water and squirt it into the animal's throat with an ear syringe. 

 

Application of Transfer Factor in Veterinary Medicine:  Canine, Feline, Equine and Livestock  Simply stated, transfer factors are tiny molecules that are able to convey immunity information from one entity to another to educate naďve cells about a present or potential danger along with a plan for action. Although the mostly notable function of these smart molecules is to speed up the recognition phase of an infection making the duration of an illness much shorter, transfer factors also have the ability to suppress an over active immune system. All said, transfer factors have the ability to balance out the function of your immune system, whether it needs to increase in function or be reduced in the case of auto-immune disorders.

 
 
Veterinarian use 4life Transfer Factor as an immune booster to treat ear and eye infections, mange, cancer, kidney and bladder conditions, skin disease, flea pet allergies, obsessive licking of paws and genital areas, leaky eye, wound that do not heal, infected ulcer, in cats, dogs, horse, rodents, farm animals, livestock, and birds.Vaccinations may even contribute to premature death in animals whose immune systems were already compromised, some veterinarians believe. "I had two situations where we had spent a long time building up two older, severely immunocompromised dogs, and then their owners had them vaccinated for just about everything known to man," recalled Dr. Carvel Tiekert, executive director and founder of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association headquartered in Bel Air, Maryland. "Both of those dogs died within about a month of vaccination. Can we prove a cause and effect? No. Do I think there was a cause and effect? Yes.
 
 
 
Question to Dr. Falconer: does vaccination (or over-vaccination) causes overactive immune reaction (autoimmune disorder) or does it cause suppression of the immune system?

Dr. Will Falconer D.V.M: "The answer is YES.  Probably both.  Vaccination *confuses* the immune system, as I point out in my heartworm eBook. So, it could go either way, or alternate over time between the two. Transfer Factor is a natural nutritional product that help support the animal's immune system. A healthy immune system is capable of helping the body heal itself. Transfer Factor should be given before and immediately after vaccination for at least a few weeks to help ameliorate the confusion (when someone is faced with a mandatory vaccination, or has decided they want to give one).  By giving the immune system with Transfer Factor, the immune intelligence should be able to better sort through the confusion, though I'm not sure that's measurable.

 
 
Richard H. Bennett, Ph.D - "For decades, the approach to maintaining healthy animals was to wait for signs and symptoms of disease to occur and to counter the challenge with an array of drugs which were toxic for the disease causing agent.  This approach is now being questioned as the armada of drugs is diminishing due to multiple drug resistant pathogens.  Compounding this alarming trend is the current approach to health maintenance which assumes that "all is well" until actual disease processes begin. By this time, the disease is established, sometimes irreversibly, and the damage has occurred.  So the questions arises...What if a new paradigm existed?  Could it be possible to optimize the immune status of animals so that (1) disease is much less likely to occur and (2) if disease does occur, it's severity and duration is minimized?  The answer is YES and this paradigm shift is being engineered by small, naturally occuring protein-like molecules called TRANSFER FACTORS." Dr. Richard Bennett holds a doctorate in Comparatie Pathology from the University of California, Davis.  His work in this area includes basic and applied research in infectious disease microbiology and immunology.